Protecting Honey Bees from Asian Giant Hornets

Protecting Honey Bees from Asian Giant Hornets - Giant Hornet Predator Attacking Bees as a Murder hornet or Asian giant insect that kills honeybees as an animal concept for an invasive speciesin a 3D illustration style.

Asian giant hornets pose a serious threat to the declining bee population within the United States, and scientists have now raised their concerns. What is particularly surprising is the fact that no one understands how the insect came to the US in the first place. And it is worrying that it might spread to other states. How then do you protect yourself and your honey bees? Read on to find out.

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Using Fluvalinate for Varroa Mite Treatment

Fluvalinate for Varroa Mite Treatment

Fluvalinate is a synthetic pyrethroid that is commonly used in the control of Varroa mites in bees. Fluvalinate is sold under varying brand names and is one of the first pesticides to be registered with the EPA for the control of Varroa mites in the United States. It may be applied in form of strips or other preparations. The Fluvalinate Mite Killing Pest Control Varroa Strip® comes in packages of 20 yellow colored plastic strips. No license is required to purchase and use these strips as the pesticide (Fluvalinate) is already licensed. This article looks at using Fluvalinate for Varroa mite treatment and the benefits it gives you in your beekeeping operation.

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Do You Need a Brood Booster for your Beehives?

Brood Booster

The brood is the lifeline and the future of the bee colony. Therefore, the beekeeper that is able to raise a healthy brood is guaranteed of success from the beginning. The process of feeding your brood with brood booster can be simple but the catch lies in determining whether it is necessary to feed the bees with it or not, getting the right measurement and deciding when to do so.

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Genetic Diversity in Honeybees – Avoiding Inbreeding

Genetic Diversity in Honeybees - Queen bee in bee hive laying eggs

Genetic diversity and avoiding inbreeding is important in honeybees as in other organisms too. This article focuses on informing you about how honeybees avoid inbreeding and ensure genetic diversity. It aims to equip you with knowledge for your better appreciation of honeybees and also to make you a better beekeeper. By understanding the importance of some honeybee activities, you will be able to facilitate them better so that they take place in optimum conditions for best outcomes. Genetic diversity has many advantages in all species due to ensuring suppression of most of the bad genes. Good genetic diversity in honeybee colonies gives the members of the colony hybrid vigor.

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Protecting Beehives from Termites

Protecting Beehives from Termites

Beekeeping faces threats from many pests, diseases, and predators. Beehives made of wood face threats from termites. Protecting beehives from termites reduces the operating cost of beekeeping, leading to higher earnings. Beekeeping is a popular commercial activity in the United States and many other places worldwide. Termites are one of the major pests identified as affecting beekeeping. Beekeepers need not worry however, as there are various simple methods to prevent termites from attacking wooden beehives.

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Medieval Beekeeping – The History of Beekeeping

Medieval Beekeeping - Medieval skep beehives and modern Langstroth beehives.

Honey hunting or the opportunistic stealing of honey from wild bee colonies was the defining characteristic of medieval beekeeping. The beginning of true beekeeping was the development of artificial chambers for honeybees to construct comb where the queen could lay eggs, and the workers could gather honey. The Egyptians had mastered apiculture by 2450 BCE, and two thousand years later, beekeeping with horizontal hives had spread all over the Mediterranean region.  From the 13th century onward, the art of beekeeping became a significant part of medieval life. Honey was the main product. However, another product from bees gained more importance as the candle -made from beeswax, became a mainstay of medieval culture. Beeswax was the primary material for making candles used in religious ceremonies. It is no wonder that monasteries became ardent beekeepers simply because they needed beeswax for candle making. In reality, many monastic orders saw the maintenance of bees and the collecting of their honey as a way to generate cash in addition to the production of food and candle wax. Monasteries are credited with pioneering modern beekeeping practices in England, France, Germany, and most of Europe.

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