BeeKeepClub’s Beekeeping Blog

An Introduction to Native Bees

Native Bees

Bees belong to a group of insects that belong to the Hymenoptera order, ideally referring to insects with membrane wings. Within this order are a total of 100,000 species of insects. In total there are 25 thousand different kinds of bees in existence. Most people are more familiar with the honey bee, primarily because they are largely domesticated and they produce a food consumed by humans. There are however, many other bees that live a solitary lifestyle. This kind survives and thrives inside small tunnels. Bees are social insects and even in cases of solitary species, you might find a number of females sharing a tunnel. Some other bee species exhibit a semi or social organization with a hierarchical arrangement for the female bees. Bumblebees, tropical stingless bees and honey bees belong to the same family. The social organization of this group is similar across the board, with one fertile female queen vested with the responsibility of laying eggs for the colony. The other colony members will devote their lifetime to serving the queen and handling any other important tasks within the colony. These include cleaning, defense, feeding brood, feeding the queen, removal of dirt or dead bees, foraging, and many others.

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What is Burr Comb? – Issues with Comb

What is Burr Comb

Any beekeeper, particularly beginners, would not want to come across burr combs in their beehives. Burr comb is formed out of the spaces that exist between the frames. The spacing should be as even as possible. Moreover, they should be just wide enough to allow for movement of the honey bees between the combs and the hive. This means that it should not be too large or too small. Burr combs connect one frame to a another nearby frame, or one frame to the wall of the beehive. This depends on where the space occurs. This is problematic for the beekeeper since the connected frames cannot be removed easily or safely. This is because the burr comb must first be broken before the frame can be pulled from the hive. This can take a lot of time to correct.

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How to Deal with Wildlife Squatters in Your Backyard

House owners know the worth of well-maintained and cozy backyards. The entire family can gather in that area after school or work to have a rest and spend some time together. However, it’s difficult to relax when you have wildlife squatters in the backyard. They can cause significant damage to your shrubs and flowers. Also, some pests could spread into your house and make a real mess there. In this article you’ll learn how to deal with wildlife squatters and free your backyard.

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Analyzing Honeycomb: Queen Cells/Comb

Queen Cells

The honeybee colony is complex by design and handle seamlessly a number of tasks: defense, communication, division of labor, food production, nest building, colony condition control, and many others. Within a colony exists a number of cells and it is crucial for the beekeeper to understand how each looks like. Knowing how to identify and analyzing queen cells is essential since this is where the future of the colony is pegged.

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The Importance of Honey Bees in Agriculture

Importance of Honey Bees in Agriculture

Bees are an important species impacting many aspects of human life, particularly agriculture. Plant production in agriculture requires fertilization of plant gametes. This is enabled by pollination, which is largely about the transfer of pollen grains from one section of the flower to another. In the best cases of pollination, pollen from one plant is transferred to another plant of the same species. This is called cross pollination. Genetic diversity in plants of the same species is better with cross pollination than with self pollination or vegetative growth of new plants. This article discusses the importance of honey bees in agriculture, and gives you a perspective on the roles all species play in sustaining life on Earth and how they impact ecosystems.

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Amazing Things You Can Make out of Beeswax

Bees are essential for human life - they pollinate 75% of farmed crops and 90% of wild plants. If bees became extinct, there would be widespread global famine, and humans would soon be extinct too. Not only are they of utmost importance for the ecosystem; bees also produce wax that can be used for some amazing products. It’s not just good for polishing furniture: beeswax is actually a valuable commodity. If the bees produce 1lb of wax, they would have to consume between 6 and 8 lbs of honey. Beeswax is also antibacterial and antifungal, which is why it is often used in toiletries. This versatile product simply wouldn’t be possible without the bees. 

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How to Attract and Catch a Swarm of Bees

How to Attract and Catch a Swarm of Bees

Beekeepers seeking to expand their apiaries need to get honey bee swarms for new beehive boxes. To do this, you may either purchase package bees or catch a swarm of bees yourself. In this article, we'll discuss in detail how to attract and catch a swarm of bees. It also explores different ways to make sure the swarm you catch gets comfortable quickly in their new home.

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Ideas to Go Backyard Camping

Backyard Camping

Camping is one of the oldest and arguably most popular outdoor activities. Anyone who’s looking for some good old outdoor fun should consider camping as one of the options. That said, it’s worth mentioning that if you wish to go camping, you will usually need to prepare well in advance, to ensure that you’ve got all you may need. However, if you add a bit of a nontraditional twist to this fun activity, you can enjoy it practically whenever you feel like it. Backyard camping has become a very popular option, especially for people who can’t really afford to up and go camping whenever they feel like spending time in nature. It’s also a great option for kids to have some outdoor fun, while still staying safe. So, let’s explore some fun backyard camping ideas.

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Want to Stop Being a Buzzkill? Start by Helping Save the Bees

Save the Bees

Bees are important to the food chain for humans around the world. Perhaps this is why bees have recently been declared “the most invaluable species on the planet.” Unfortunately, the world’s bee population is threatened. Colony collapse syndrome has been killing bees in record numbers - and nobody is sure why. Even worse, as politics come into play, saving the bees looks to be an uphill battle.

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