BeeKeepClub’s Beekeeping Blog

Low Carbon’s Buzzing Biodiversity Success

Low Carbon's Buzzing Biodiversity Success

The plight of the honeybee is an ever-growing concern for scientists, posing threats to our ecosystem and life as we know it. So what is the future of the honeybee?  Low Carbon, a UK-based renewable energy investment and asset management company, believes that supporting greater biodiversity and the bees as an essential part in the fight against climate change. Low Carbon has installed beehives on its solar parks across the UK with more than 2 million bees thriving in these protected sites. Watch the video to find out more about these wildflower-filled solar farms, that are quite literally buzzing with biodiversity.

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Beehive Comparison – Langstroth, Top Bar and Warré

Beehive Comparison

Beekeeping has seen a lot of advances over the years. One component of the practice cannot be ignored is the type of beehive that is used. There are various types of beehives that are common today. They all came about from research by various beekeepers and inventors who studied bees and then developed the beehives that house them. In modern beekeeping, three beehive types stand out and lead the pack. These are the Langstroth, Top bar and Warré beehives. Their popularity and appropriateness in beekeeping varies by the individual beekeeper and the region where beekeeping is being practiced. In this article we will be looking at a beehive comparison of the Langstroth, Top bar and Warré beehives. We will look at the design of the beehives themselves, their upsides, downsides and a brief history of each.

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What is Bridge Comb and How to Remove it?

Bridge Comb

Honey bees build comb in the beehive and in the wild too. The comb they build is usually straight downwards and only extends sideways to a uniform wideness. Sometimes however, they may build comb that is not straight downwards. It may extend sideways and join more than one frame in a beehive. This is called bridge comb - honeycomb that is built in a way that is not expected in and joins two or more frames at the top or bottom. In addition to this, you might find honeycomb built in other wrong places in the beehive. Other types of unusual honeycomb in beehives are brace comb and cross comb, and they are all collectively called burr comb.

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Festooning Bees – what’s that about?

Festooning Bees

Despite the numerous studies on honey bee behavior, there are still certain things that are are a mystery to us as humans. One such mystery is festooning bees. But what exactly is festooning? Well it is a behavior of bees where they form a lace work, one layer thick, and are joined leg by leg between the frames of the comb. In this article we'll dive in and dissect this mystery just a bit.

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The Warré Hive – the Beginner’s Introduction

Warré Hive

Modern beekeeping for honey bee conservation and beehive products makes use of a variety of beehives. Among these is the Warré beehive. Other beehives are the top bar hive and the Langstroth beehive (check out our article on the comparison of these beehives).  This beginner’s introduction to the Warré hive explores the history of the hive and its key features. It also looks at other important areas for beekeepers using the Warré hive, including its management and components of the hive.

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What is Burr Comb? – Issues with Comb

What is Burr Comb

Any beekeeper, particularly beginners, would not want to come across burr combs in their beehives. Burr comb is formed out of the spaces that exist between the frames. The spacing should be as even as possible. Moreover, they should be just wide enough to allow for movement of the honey bees between the combs and the hive. This means that it should not be too large or too small. Burr combs connect one frame to a another nearby frame, or one frame to the wall of the beehive. This depends on where the space occurs. This is problematic for the beekeeper since the connected frames cannot be removed easily or safely. This is because the burr comb must first be broken before the frame can be pulled from the hive. This can take a lot of time to correct.

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How to Encourage Honey Bees to Build Comb

How to Encourage Honey Bees to Build Comb

When you really think about it, a honey bee colony in itself is mind-boggling. It is a self-sufficient unit with tens of thousands of buzzing bees grouped into various categories, with each given its unique role within the colony. Honey bees carry out all manner of tasks that are essential for the survival of their colony. One such task is the building of honeycombs. While honey bees will do so naturally on their own, there are things that beekeepers can do to encourage bees to build comb more quickly. In this article, we will be discussing how we can encourage bees to build comb.

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Top Bar Beekeeping for Beginners

Top bar hives are single-story beehives that can be used in both hobbyist and commercial beekeeping. In a top bar hive, the comb hangs downwards from removable bars. These bars form the roof of the beehive. A top bar hive has one rectangular box only. It is wide and allows for beekeeping methods that have little interference with the honey bee colony. Top bar hives generally have very high beeswax yields but less honey yields. Other types of types of popular beehives are the Langstroth and the Warré hives (check out our article on the comparison of these beehives). Read on as we discuss top bar beekeeping for beginners.

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