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How to Build a Langstroth Beehive Top Cover

How to Build a Langstroth Beehive Top Cover

The Langstroth beehive top cover is very important due to its primary function of protecting the beehive. The top cover keeps the elements out, prevents water and solid items such as snow entering from above. It works in conjunction with an inner cover to keep everything dry. The top cover can be telescoping and flat or garbled (sloped). The inner cover is always flat and does not telescope over the sides of the beehive. This article shows you how to build a Langstroth beehive top cover as well as the inner cover.

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What is Brace Comb? – Issues with Comb

Brace Comb

Brace comb is one of the many types of comb (see bridge comb, cross comb) that is built in places beekeepers do not expect or want honeycomb to be built by honey bees. As its name suggests, brace comb is drawn by honey bees in beehives to support regular honeycomb from falling. It usually attaches to the sides of the beehive. Brace comb can be built in any type of beehive but is usually more common in top bar and Warré hives. This is because Langstroth beehives have beehive frames whose sides present a barrier between honeycombs and brace comb that bees might draw. In Warré and top bar hives, there are no frames used, and so bees find it easy to draw comb onto the sides of the beehive. Comb in unwanted places in a beehive is not entirely unusual in beekeeping. It is more of a norm than the exception. Every beekeeper encounters such honeycomb in beekeeping. Vigilance against unwanted comb is the best respite, you want to see it early and take care of it before it gets out of hand. In this article, we'll discuss how you can deal with brace comb.

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How to Make a Homemade Bee Feeder

Homemade Beeder Feeder

Honey bee colonies sometimes experience periods of resource shortage. It is alright to feed honey bees when they do not have enough food resources to keep the colony going. Feeding the colony requires you to have one or more types of feeders. There are also many different types of feed that can be given to honey bees and the main ones are sugar syrup and pollen. Pollen is usually fed in powder form, or in the form of pollen patties. Sugar syrup fed to bees is of 1:1 ratio of sugar and water, or 2:1. This article delves into the feeding of honey bees and how to build a homemade bee feeder for your apiary.

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What is Cross Comb? – Issues with Comb

Cross Comb

Cross comb is a type of comb that is drawn by honey bees that connects two beehive frames. It is one of the many types of comb that are built in places where the beekeeper does not want comb to be built. Cross comb is a result of bees extending comb horizontally and the comb encroaching into the space of the adjacent beehive frame. It usually results in the comb of two frames joining. Cross comb makes beehive inspections difficult or nearly impossible. It also reduces the space available to bees to use in the beehive if it gets built across many or large areas of honeycomb. For these reasons, beekeepers are not happy with cross comb in their beehives. They aim to prevent the building of cross comb, or remove it when they find it already built.

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The Ethical Harvesting of Honey

Ethical Harvesting of Honey

Honey is the oldest source of sweetness known to mankind. Ever since we started exploring its benefits, honey has played a major part in food and medicines. The presence of honey was first discovered in Spain in the cave of Valencia. In the cave the honey seeker was portrayed on an 8000 year old cave painting at Arana Caves in Spain. This ancient painting shows a person extracting honey from wild beehive, which indicates that humans have been practicing honey harvesting for as long as 5000 BC. Today with all these years of experience and knowledge, there is new technology and better ways to harvest honey. Yet, the question lingers, are the ways of honey harvesting ethical?

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Low Carbon’s Buzzing Biodiversity Success

Low Carbon's Buzzing Biodiversity Success

The plight of the honeybee is an ever-growing concern for scientists, posing threats to our ecosystem and life as we know it. So what is the future of the honeybee?  Low Carbon, a UK-based renewable energy investment and asset management company, believes that supporting greater biodiversity and the bees as an essential part in the fight against climate change. Low Carbon has installed beehives on its solar parks across the UK with more than 2 million bees thriving in these protected sites. Watch the video to find out more about these wildflower-filled solar farms, that are quite literally buzzing with biodiversity.

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Beehive Comparison – Langstroth, Top Bar and Warré

Beehive Comparison

Beekeeping has seen a lot of advances over the years. One component of the practice cannot be ignored is the type of beehive that is used. There are various types of beehives that are common today. They all came about from research by various beekeepers and inventors who studied bees and then developed the beehives that house them. In modern beekeeping, three beehive types stand out and lead the pack. These are the Langstroth, Top bar and Warré beehives. Their popularity and appropriateness in beekeeping varies by the individual beekeeper and the region where beekeeping is being practiced. In this article we will be looking at a beehive comparison of the Langstroth, Top bar and Warré beehives. We will look at the design of the beehives themselves, their upsides, downsides and a brief history of each.

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What is Bridge Comb and How to Remove it?

Bridge Comb

Honey bees build comb in the beehive and in the wild too. The comb they build is usually straight downwards and only extends sideways to a uniform wideness. Sometimes however, they may build comb that is not straight downwards. It may extend sideways and join more than one frame in a beehive. This is called bridge comb - honeycomb that is built in a way that is not expected in and joins two or more frames at the top or bottom. In addition to this, you might find honeycomb built in other wrong places in the beehive. Other types of unusual honeycomb in beehives are brace comb and cross comb, and they are all collectively called burr comb.

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How to Make Langstroth Beehive Frames

How to Make Langstroth Beehive Frames

Langstroth beehives are synonymous with modern beekeeping. From the invention of the beehive, it has gripped the beekeeping industry like a giant. The iconic beehive provides a great home for honey bee colonies when built well. It is divided into the lower section, beehive boxes and the upper section. Langstroth beehives have several components that are held in it including beehive frames. This article guides you on how to make Langstroth beehive frames. The frames are held in beehive boxes that make up a beehive stack. We will look at deep beehive box frames, medium and shallow beehive box frames. The frames you make can be used in both 8-frame and 10-frame Langstroth beehive setups.

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