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Why Bees are Important

Bees do more to save the world than we could ever do, as they are an integral part of our ecosystem and work to keep the planet healthy. It might also surprise you that there are over 20,000 species of bees that we know about in the UK. From bumblebees, honeybees and solitary bees, each species contributes a lot to the UK's environmental balance and the planet's wellbeing. Let’s take a look at why bees are important.

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Treating Tracheal Mites in Honey Bees

Treating Tracheal Mites in Honey Bees

The tracheal mite, while not native to America, was first reported in Texas where, in 1984, a commercial apiary operation tested positive for the mite. It has by now spread to all the beekeeping states in the USA despite a huge effort to control the spread by destroying infected colonies. The parasite is spread easily among colonies by drifting bees and through any activity where live bees are moved around colonies. Honey bees contaminated with mites have been found in randomly selected swarms (colonies) and even in packaged bees and queens. This guide takes you through treating tracheal mites (Acarapis Woodi) in honey bees.

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How to Insulate a Beehive for Winter

How to Insulate a Beehive for Winter

The survival of honey bee colonies in winter is important in beekeeping. It ensures the beekeeper has a colony to start the new production year with. Wintering honey bee colonies emerge stronger in spring when they have high number of bees. Insulating beehives helps prevent heat loss. Bees in an insulated beehive use less energy to warm the hive. Fewer bees die in such a honey bee colony. This article guides you through how to insulate a beehive for winter.

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Apivar vs Apiguard Comparison Review

Apivar vs Apiguard - Mite in a Beehive

Varroa mite control in beekeeping is important to prevent losses and colony collapse. The Varroa mite attacks both adult bees and brood, though they tend to prefer the brood of drone bees. Left unchecked, Varroa mites will prey on worker bee brood as well. Beekeepers have a number of options to use in controlling honey bee mites. This article compares two popular mite control methods - Apivar vs Apiguard. There are various companies manufacturing and selling Apivar and Apiguard under varying trade names.

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Oxalic Acid Pure Powder for the Treatment of Varroosis Review

Pure Powder Oxalic Acid for Varroa Mite Treatment

Varroa mites are perhaps the most common pest devastating honey bee colonies within the US and beyond. The mite is a close relative to ticks common in livestock. This can explain why it is treated using similar products. Oxalic acid is particularly one of the products that have been tested and proven to work when it comes to the treatment of varroosis. It is an acaricide that is usually applied through three different techniques of treatment: spraying, trickling, and evaporation. It is generally effective in combating the varroa mites and is also tolerable to the honey bees. Oxalic Acid Pure Powder is a special formulation meant for the treatment of varroa mites. It helps in the elimination of other parasites found in the inter-frame space as well.

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Beehive Maintenance Guide for Beginners and Experts

Beehive Maintenance

Keeping honeybee colonies for any purpose requires that you check on them and ensure they are doing well. This is called beehive maintenance in beekeeping. It is necessary in all beekeeping operations including in conservation beekeeping. Proper beehive maintenance enables the best health of honeybee colonies. It also promotes better production rates of the beekeeping operation. Maintenance practices vary widely from hygiene practices to those about the structural integrity of beehives. Both beginner and experienced beekeepers can perform proper beehive maintenance. In this beehive maintenance guide for beginners and experts, we outline the various activities you should carry out and their benefits too.

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Low Carbon’s Buzzing Biodiversity Success

Low Carbon's Buzzing Biodiversity Success

The plight of the honeybee is an ever-growing concern for scientists, posing threats to our ecosystem and life as we know it. So what is the future of the honeybee?  Low Carbon, a UK-based renewable energy investment and asset management company, believes that supporting greater biodiversity and the bees as an essential part in the fight against climate change. Low Carbon has installed beehives on its solar parks across the UK with more than 2 million bees thriving in these protected sites. Watch the video to find out more about these wildflower-filled solar farms, that are quite literally buzzing with biodiversity.

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What is Brace Comb? – Issues with Comb

Brace Comb

Brace comb is one of the many types of comb (see bridge comb, cross comb) that is built in places beekeepers do not expect or want honeycomb to be built by honey bees. As its name suggests, brace comb is drawn by honey bees in beehives to support regular honeycomb from falling. It usually attaches to the sides of the beehive. Brace comb can be built in any type of beehive but is usually more common in top bar and Warré hives. This is because Langstroth beehives have beehive frames whose sides present a barrier between honeycombs and brace comb that bees might draw. In Warré and top bar hives, there are no frames used, and so bees find it easy to draw comb onto the sides of the beehive. Comb in unwanted places in a beehive is not entirely unusual in beekeeping. It is more of a norm than the exception. Every beekeeper encounters such honeycomb in beekeeping. Vigilance against unwanted comb is the best respite, you want to see it early and take care of it before it gets out of hand. In this article, we'll discuss how you can deal with brace comb.

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Why Pesticide Use is Bad for Bees and Other Pollinators

Pesticide Use and Pollination

Applying pesticides to control various organisms and diseases that affect human interests in agricultural and urban environments, has effects on honeybees and other pollinators in general. From reading this article, you will understand why pesticide use is bad for bees and other pollinators. The article also looks into the various factors that impact the degree of effects of pesticides on bees. In addition to understanding the problem, read on to know the various methods you can use to alleviate the bad effects of pesticides on bees. You also learn about many available alternatives to pesticides. Using the information in this article, you can thus easily change your practices to provide better environments for honeybees and be able to control pests, diseases and weeds.

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