Tag Archives: Comb

What is Brace Comb? – Issues with Comb

Brace Comb

Brace comb is one of the many types of comb (see bridge comb, cross comb) that is built in places beekeepers do not expect or want honeycomb to be built by honey bees. As its name suggests, brace comb is drawn by honey bees in beehives to support regular honeycomb from falling. It usually attaches to the sides of the beehive. Brace comb can be built in any type of beehive but is usually more common in top bar and Warré hives. This is because Langstroth beehives have beehive frames whose sides present a barrier between honeycombs and brace comb that bees might draw. In Warré and top bar hives, there are no frames used, and so bees find it easy to draw comb onto the sides of the beehive. Comb in unwanted places in a beehive is not entirely unusual in beekeeping. It is more of a norm than the exception. Every beekeeper encounters such honeycomb in beekeeping. Vigilance against unwanted comb is the best respite, you want to see it early and take care of it before it gets out of hand. In this article, we'll discuss how you can deal with brace comb.

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What is Cross Comb? – Issues with Comb

Cross Comb

Cross comb is a type of comb that is drawn by honey bees that connects two beehive frames. It is one of the many types of comb that are built in places where the beekeeper does not want comb to be built. Cross comb is a result of bees extending comb horizontally and the comb encroaching into the space of the adjacent beehive frame. It usually results in the comb of two frames joining. Cross comb makes beehive inspections difficult or nearly impossible. It also reduces the space available to bees to use in the beehive if it gets built across many or large areas of honeycomb. For these reasons, beekeepers are not happy with cross comb in their beehives. They aim to prevent the building of cross comb, or remove it when they find it already built.

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What is Bridge Comb and How to Remove it?

Bridge Comb

Honey bees build comb in the beehive and in the wild too. The comb they build is usually straight downwards and only extends sideways to a uniform wideness. Sometimes however, they may build comb that is not straight downwards. It may extend sideways and join more than one frame in a beehive. This is called bridge comb - honeycomb that is built in a way that is not expected in and joins two or more frames at the top or bottom. In addition to this, you might find honeycomb built in other wrong places in the beehive. Other types of unusual honeycomb in beehives are brace comb and cross comb, and they are all collectively called burr comb.

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What is Burr Comb? – Issues with Comb

What is Burr Comb

Any beekeeper, particularly beginners, would not want to come across burr combs in their beehives. Burr comb is formed out of the spaces that exist between the frames. The spacing should be as even as possible. Moreover, they should be just wide enough to allow for movement of the honey bees between the combs and the hive. This means that it should not be too large or too small. Burr combs connect one frame to a another nearby frame, or one frame to the wall of the beehive. This depends on where the space occurs. This is problematic for the beekeeper since the connected frames cannot be removed easily or safely. This is because the burr comb must first be broken before the frame can be pulled from the hive. This can take a lot of time to correct.

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How to Encourage Honey Bees to Build Comb

How to Encourage Honey Bees to Build Comb

When you really think about it, a honey bee colony in itself is mind-boggling. It is a self-sufficient unit with tens of thousands of buzzing bees grouped into various categories, with each given its unique role within the colony. Honey bees carry out all manner of tasks that are essential for the survival of their colony. One such task is the building of honeycombs. While honey bees will do so naturally on their own, there are things that beekeepers can do to encourage bees to build comb more quickly. In this article, we will be discussing how we can encourage bees to build comb.

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